< >

Elan Greenwald A Matter of Appearance

English

Opening on April 16, 2015 at 7.00 pm

Exhibition from April 16 to June 13, 2015

 

We are pleased to inaugurate on April 16, 2015 at 7 pm with A Matter of Appearance our first solo exhibition of Los Angeles artist Elan Greenwald. Greenwald was a Fellow at Cologne's Kunsthochschule für Medien for the last six months. He worked on a project about the colossal Nazi beach resort Prora that will be shown at Agency in Los Angeles this May. In Cologne we will show Greenwald's first single exhibition. Here he will exhibit two groups of works:
The first, A Matter of Appearance, the work that gives the exhibition its title, consists of three categories of objects: seven watercolor "portraits" of Greenwald’s “favorite” artists; Michael Asher, Daniel Buren, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Mike Kelley, Mathias Poledna, and Stephen Prina. A group of scanned and perfectly digitally manipulated boarding passes that bear these artists’ names and – through an intricate system of signs – their exhibition history and age. And, finally, a video showing the artist himself, clad in white coveralls covered in real-world logos using his first name.
Over centuries, watercolor has earned a reputation as a dilettante’s medium, used by those with "time to waste". While Greenwald does not have time to waste, these paintings, his first works in watercolor, draw on that impression. Also: By describing the watercolors as "portraits" one could be mislead to think that they really show the artists while they are flying from one place to another. However, Greenwald rather pictures (with his brush) these artists as airplane passengers or, said in a more abstract way, as vacant representations of artists that have a certain importance: artists that have reached a certain notoriety in the art world as teaching or exhibiting artists, successful artists on the move by air within an international network. By not representing the artists, by withholding from his pictures personal features that would otherwise identify the sitter as a specific person, Greenwald depicts the representation of persons in general. The relation between "sitter" and "work" is interchangeable.
All seven artists had been indicated to him as potentially interesting for him by his teachers while he was still a student. The "portraits" thus can be taken as souvenirs of identification and idealization. In addition to that, the seven artists have a more or less conceptual, sometimes site specific, some times critical and even political praxis in common. "Institutional critique" is the common denominator. As a degree-carrying Master of Fine Arts, having graduated under the spell of these artists, Greenwald throws his name among those of his favorites.
In addition to "identifying" the individual artists, the "boarding passes” give us a plausible flight path for each of the artists based on their solo exhibition history around the date they had been identified to Greenwald. Plus: the departure gate number represents the age of the artists at the time they had been identified (thus telling us also indirectly when Greenwald had learned about them). And the flight numbers on the boarding passes indicate the number of solo exhibitions the artists had had at the moment of identification. Finally, the boarding passes allow us to identify the artists’ countries of origin. They fly on either the flag carrier of their home country or one of the three major US-based airlines whose corporate branding relies on symbols of nationalism.
The video, the third part of A Matter of Appearance, shows the artist painting while clad in white coveralls covered in logos that recall his first name, a name that belongs both to Greenwald and to a variety of commercial products and corporations. The video consists mainly of shots of these logos in near-isolation which faithfully reproduce these graphic design motifs’ immaterial qualities as signs. Through a methodical cycle of shots that both show and withhold from view, the video takes the form of a fetish video.
The second group of works consists of seven – and there are more to come, because, as mentioned, the artist has no time to waste – photographs that show watercolors of anonymous airplane passengers painted in the plein air of airplane cabins, the folding table in front of the artist sitting in a plane (and thus: the easel in this very situation), the paint box, the brushes, and other incidental elements placed on the table. The watercolors' inherent immediacy is broken by the photograph of the whole context, and sometimes even parts of the artist himself. Between the viewer and the watercolor lies the mediated sterile surface of the photograph. 
For further information or images please contact the gallery.
We are pleased to inaugurate on April 16, 2015 at 7 pm with A Matter of Appearance our first solo exhibition of Los Angeles artist Elan Greenwald. Greenwald was a Fellow at Cologne's Kunsthochschule für Medien for the last six months. He worked on a project about the colossal Nazi beach resort Prora that will be shown at Agency in Los Angeles this May. In Cologne we will show Greenwald's first single exhibition. Here he will exhibit two groups of works:
The first, A Matter of Appearance, the work that gives the exhibition its title, consists of three categories of objects: seven watercolor "portraits" of Greenwald’s “favorite” artists; Michael Asher, Daniel Buren, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Mike Kelley, Mathias Poledna, and Stephen Prina. A group of scanned and perfectly digitally manipulated boarding passes that bear these artists’ names and – through an intricate system of signs – their exhibition history and age. And, finally, a video showing the artist himself, clad in white coveralls covered in real-world logos using his first name.
Over centuries, watercolor has earned a reputation as a dilettante’s medium, used by those with "time to waste". While Greenwald does not have time to waste, these paintings, his first works in watercolor, draw on that impression. Also: By describing the watercolors as "portraits" one could be mislead to think that they really show the artists while they are flying from one place to another. However, Greenwald rather pictures (with his brush) these artists as airplane passengers or, said in a more abstract way, as vacant representations of artists that have a certain importance: artists that have reached a certain notoriety in the art world as teaching or exhibiting artists, successful artists on the move by air within an international network. By not representing the artists, by withholding from his pictures personal features that would otherwise identify the sitter as a specific person, Greenwald depicts the representation of persons in general. The relation between "sitter" and "work" is interchangeable.
All seven artists had been indicated to him as potentially interesting for him by his teachers while he was still a student. The "portraits" thus can be taken as souvenirs of identification and idealization. In addition to that, the seven artists have a more or less conceptual, sometimes site specific, some times critical and even political praxis in common. "Institutional critique" is the common denominator. As a degree-carrying Master of Fine Arts, having graduated under the spell of these artists, Greenwald throws his name among those of his favorites.
In addition to "identifying" the individual artists, the "boarding passes” give us a plausible flight path for each of the artists based on their solo exhibition history around the date they had been identified to Greenwald. Plus: the departure gate number represents the age of the artists at the time they had been identified (thus telling us also indirectly when Greenwald had learned about them). And the flight numbers on the boarding passes indicate the number of solo exhibitions the artists had had at the moment of identification. Finally, the boarding passes allow us to identify the artists’ countries of origin. They fly on either the flag carrier of their home country or one of the three major US-based airlines whose corporate branding relies on symbols of nationalism.
The video, the third part of A Matter of Appearance, shows the artist painting while clad in white coveralls covered in logos that recall his first name, a name that belongs both to Greenwald and to a variety of commercial products and corporations. The video consists mainly of shots of these logos in near-isolation which faithfully reproduce these graphic design motifs’ immaterial qualities as signs. Through a methodical cycle of shots that both show and withhold from view, the video takes the form of a fetish video.
The second group of works consists of seven – and there are more to come, because, as mentioned, the artist has no time to waste – photographs that show watercolors of anonymous airplane passengers painted in the plein air of airplane cabins, the folding table in front of the artist sitting in a plane (and thus: the easel in this very situation), the paint box, the brushes, and other incidental elements placed on the table. The watercolors' inherent immediacy is broken by the photograph of the whole context, and sometimes even parts of the artist himself. Between the viewer and the watercolor lies the mediated sterile surface of the photograph. 
For further information or images please contact the gallery.

 

 

 

Deutsch

Eröffnung am 16. April 2015 um 19.00 Uhr

Ausstellungsdauer: 16. April—13. Juni 2015

 

Wir freuen uns, am 16. April 2015 um 19 Uhr mit A Matter of Appearance unsere erste Einzelausstellung Elan Greenwalds (*1983, Los Angeles) zu eröffnen. In den letzten sechs Monaten war Greenwald Fellow an der Kölner Kunsthoch¬schu¬le für Medien. In dieser Zeit arbeitete er an einem Projekt über das kolossale, na¬tio¬¬nal¬so¬zia¬listische Seebad Prora, das im Mai bei Agency in Los Angeles ausge¬stellt werden wird. In Köln zeigen wir in Greenwalds erster Einzelausstellung über¬¬haupt zwei Werkgruppen:
Deren erste, A Matter of Appearance, die unser Ausstellung den Titel gibt, be¬steht aus drei Kategorien von Objekten: sieben aquarellierte "Portraits" von Greenwalds am meisten geschätzten Künstlern: Michael Asher, Daniel Buren, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Mike Kelley, Mathias Poledna und Stephen Prina. Eine Gruppe gescannter und perfekt digital manipulierter Bordkarten mit den Namen dieser Künstler und – zu lesen durch ein komplexes Zeichensystem – deren Ausstellungsgeschichte und Alter. Und, schließlich, ein Video vom Künst¬ler selbst, bekleidet mit einem weißen Overall, der mit in der wirklichen Welt exi¬stierenden Logos bedeckt ist, die seinem Vornamen entspre¬chen.
Jahrhundertelang haftete der Aquarelltechnik der Ruf an, das Medium schlecht¬hin der Dilettanten zu sein, genutzt von denen, die Zeit im Überfluß hatten. Wäh¬rend Greenwald nicht zu dieser Gruppe von Menschen gehört, knüpfen seine Aquarelle an diese romantische Vorstellung an. Und: Wenn man die Aquarelle als "Portraits" beschreibt, könnte man meinen, sie würden tatsächlich die ge¬nann¬ten Künstler zeigen und zwar auf einem Flug von einem Ort zum anderen. Da¬gegen schildert Greenwald (mit dem Pinsel) die Künstler als Flugpassagiere oder er malt, abstrakter formuliert, letztlich leere Repräsentationen von Künst¬lern, die einen gewissen Bekanntheitsgrad in der Kunstwelt als Lehrer oder Aus¬stel¬ler erlangt haben – erfolgreiche und mithin viel per Flugzeug reisende Künst¬ler mit einem internationalen Netzwerk. Indem er diese Künstler nicht wirklich re¬präsentiert, indem er seinen Bildern die persönlichen Gesichtszüge vorenthält, die ansonsten die Portraitierten als spezifische Personen identifizierbar gemacht hät¬ten, indem er also so malt, wie er malt, stellt Greenwald im Grunde ganz all¬ge¬mein die Repräsentation oder Darstellung von Personen dar. Die Beziehung zwi¬schen dem Portraitierten und den Bildern ist austauschbar.
Alle sieben Künstler waren ihm als potentiell interessant für ihn von seinen Leh¬rern während des Studiums nahegelegt worden. Die "Portraits" können deshalb auch als Souvenirs der Identifikation und Idealisierung gelesen werden. Außer¬dem ist den Künstlern ein mehr oder minder konzeptueller Ansatz gemeinsam, mal mit ortsspezifischer Ausprägung, mal in Bezug auf die Zeit, mal kritisch oder sogar politisierend. Die "Institutionskritik " ist ihr gemeinsamer Nenner und Greenwald stellt sich (als bildungshungriger Student, wenn man so will) vor, irgendwann einmal eine Gruppenausstellung mit ihnen zu kuratieren. Als Mei¬ster¬schüler, der im Bann dieser Künstler graduierte, wirft er seinen Hut in den aus seinen Favoriten gebildeten Ring.
Die "Bord¬kar¬ten" ermöglichen, die einzelnen Künstlerindividuen zu identifizie¬ren. Darüber hinaus schildern sie einen plausiblen Reiseweg für jeden der Künst¬ler, ein Reiseweg, der auf ihren Einzelausstellungen zu dem Zeitpunkt beruht, als sie Greenwald nahegelegt wurden. Ferner: die Nummer des Abflug-Gates ent¬spricht dem Alter der Künstler wiederum zu dem Zeitpunkt, als er von ihnen lern¬te (und damit kann man im Umkehrschluß auch erfahren, wann Greenwald die¬se Erfahrung machte). Und die Flugnummern auf den Bordkarten ent¬spre¬chen der Anzahl der Einzelausstellungen, die die Künstler in diesem Moment ge¬habt hatten. Schließlich offenbaren uns die Bordkarten auch das Heimatland der Künst¬ler. Sie fliegen wahlweise mit der nationalen Fluggesellschaft ihres Landes oder – im Falle der US-Amerikaner – mit einer der drei größten Flug¬ge¬sell¬schaf¬ten der USA, deren Unternehmensmarken auf nationalen Symbolen basieren.
In dem Video, dem dritten Teil von A Matter of Appearance, sehen wir den ma¬len¬den Künst¬ler in einem weißen Overall. Dieser ist mit Logos bedeckt, die an den Vornamen Greenwalds erinnern, ein Name, der zu ihm genauso wie zu einer Viel¬zahl von kommerziellen Produkten und Unternehmen gehört. Das Video be¬steht vor allem aus sehr nahen, die Logos fast isolierenden Einstellungen. Sie, die filmischen "Schüsse" reproduzieren die immateriellen Qualitäten der Grafik¬de¬sign-ten Motive als Zeichen. Durch die methodische, zyklische Wiederholung der Einstellungen, die beides tun, nämlich darstellen und zugleich einen über die Eng¬führung auf das Logo hinausreichenden Blick verhindern, nimmt das Video Zü¬ge eines Fetisch' an. 
Die zweite Werkgruppe in der Ausstellung sind sieben Fotografien – und es wer¬den weitere entstehen, denn – wie gesagt – der Künstler hat keine Zeit zu ver¬schwen¬den. Diese Fotografien zeigen Aquarelle, die ihrerseits anonyme Flug¬pas¬sa¬giere zeigen, die quasi en plein air in "airplane"-Kabinen dargestellt sind. Aus¬ser¬dem sieht man den Klapptisch am Sitz des Künstlers (und damit in diesem Fall: die Staffelei), den Farbkasten, die Pinsel, und andere nebensächliche Ge¬gen¬¬stände auf dem Tisch. Die dem Aquarell inhärente Unmittelbarkeit wird durch die Fotografie des Entstehungskontextes und – in einigen Fällen – gar von Kör¬perdetails des Künstlers selbst gebrochen. Zwischen den Betrachter und das Aquarell schiebt sich die sterile Oberfläche der Fotografie. 
Für weitere Informationen oder Abbildungen wenden Sie sich bitte an die Galerie.
Wir freuen uns, am 16. April 2015 um 19 Uhr mit A Matter of Appearance unsere erste Einzelausstellung Elan Greenwalds (*1983, Los Angeles) zu eröffnen. In den letzten sechs Monaten war Greenwald Fellow an der Kölner Kunsthoch¬schu¬le für Medien. In dieser Zeit arbeitete er an einem Projekt über das kolossale, na¬tio¬¬nal¬so¬zia¬listische Seebad Prora, das im Mai bei Agency in Los Angeles ausge¬stellt werden wird. In Köln zeigen wir in Greenwalds erster Einzelausstellung über¬¬haupt zwei Werkgruppen:
Deren erste, A Matter of Appearance, die unser Ausstellung den Titel gibt, be¬steht aus drei Kategorien von Objekten: sieben aquarellierte "Portraits" von Greenwalds am meisten geschätzten Künstlern: Michael Asher, Daniel Buren, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dan Graham, Mike Kelley, Mathias Poledna und Stephen Prina. Eine Gruppe gescannter und perfekt digital manipulierter Bordkarten mit den Namen dieser Künstler und – zu lesen durch ein komplexes Zeichensystem – deren Ausstellungsgeschichte und Alter. Und, schließlich, ein Video vom Künst¬ler selbst, bekleidet mit einem weißen Overall, der mit in der wirklichen Welt exi¬stierenden Logos bedeckt ist, die seinem Vornamen entspre¬chen.
Jahrhundertelang haftete der Aquarelltechnik der Ruf an, das Medium schlecht¬hin der Dilettanten zu sein, genutzt von denen, die Zeit im Überfluß hatten. Wäh¬rend Greenwald nicht zu dieser Gruppe von Menschen gehört, knüpfen seine Aquarelle an diese romantische Vorstellung an. Und: Wenn man die Aquarelle als "Portraits" beschreibt, könnte man meinen, sie würden tatsächlich die ge¬nann¬ten Künstler zeigen und zwar auf einem Flug von einem Ort zum anderen. Da¬gegen schildert Greenwald (mit dem Pinsel) die Künstler als Flugpassagiere oder er malt, abstrakter formuliert, letztlich leere Repräsentationen von Künst¬lern, die einen gewissen Bekanntheitsgrad in der Kunstwelt als Lehrer oder Aus¬stel¬ler erlangt haben – erfolgreiche und mithin viel per Flugzeug reisende Künst¬ler mit einem internationalen Netzwerk. Indem er diese Künstler nicht wirklich re¬präsentiert, indem er seinen Bildern die persönlichen Gesichtszüge vorenthält, die ansonsten die Portraitierten als spezifische Personen identifizierbar gemacht hät¬ten, indem er also so malt, wie er malt, stellt Greenwald im Grunde ganz all¬ge¬mein die Repräsentation oder Darstellung von Personen dar. Die Beziehung zwi¬schen dem Portraitierten und den Bildern ist austauschbar.
Alle sieben Künstler waren ihm als potentiell interessant für ihn von seinen Leh¬rern während des Studiums nahegelegt worden. Die "Portraits" können deshalb auch als Souvenirs der Identifikation und Idealisierung gelesen werden. Außer¬dem ist den Künstlern ein mehr oder minder konzeptueller Ansatz gemeinsam, mal mit ortsspezifischer Ausprägung, mal in Bezug auf die Zeit, mal kritisch oder sogar politisierend. Die "Institutionskritik " ist ihr gemeinsamer Nenner und Greenwald stellt sich (als bildungshungriger Student, wenn man so will) vor, irgendwann einmal eine Gruppenausstellung mit ihnen zu kuratieren. Als Mei¬ster¬schüler, der im Bann dieser Künstler graduierte, wirft er seinen Hut in den aus seinen Favoriten gebildeten Ring.
Die "Bord¬kar¬ten" ermöglichen, die einzelnen Künstlerindividuen zu identifizie¬ren. Darüber hinaus schildern sie einen plausiblen Reiseweg für jeden der Künst¬ler, ein Reiseweg, der auf ihren Einzelausstellungen zu dem Zeitpunkt beruht, als sie Greenwald nahegelegt wurden. Ferner: die Nummer des Abflug-Gates ent¬spricht dem Alter der Künstler wiederum zu dem Zeitpunkt, als er von ihnen lern¬te (und damit kann man im Umkehrschluß auch erfahren, wann Greenwald die¬se Erfahrung machte). Und die Flugnummern auf den Bordkarten ent¬spre¬chen der Anzahl der Einzelausstellungen, die die Künstler in diesem Moment ge¬habt hatten. Schließlich offenbaren uns die Bordkarten auch das Heimatland der Künst¬ler. Sie fliegen wahlweise mit der nationalen Fluggesellschaft ihres Landes oder – im Falle der US-Amerikaner – mit einer der drei größten Flug¬ge¬sell¬schaf¬ten der USA, deren Unternehmensmarken auf nationalen Symbolen basieren.
In dem Video, dem dritten Teil von A Matter of Appearance, sehen wir den ma¬len¬den Künst¬ler in einem weißen Overall. Dieser ist mit Logos bedeckt, die an den Vornamen Greenwalds erinnern, ein Name, der zu ihm genauso wie zu einer Viel¬zahl von kommerziellen Produkten und Unternehmen gehört. Das Video be¬steht vor allem aus sehr nahen, die Logos fast isolierenden Einstellungen. Sie, die filmischen "Schüsse" reproduzieren die immateriellen Qualitäten der Grafik¬de¬sign-ten Motive als Zeichen. Durch die methodische, zyklische Wiederholung der Einstellungen, die beides tun, nämlich darstellen und zugleich einen über die Eng¬führung auf das Logo hinausreichenden Blick verhindern, nimmt das Video Zü¬ge eines Fetisch' an. 
Die zweite Werkgruppe in der Ausstellung sind sieben Fotografien – und es wer¬den weitere entstehen, denn – wie gesagt – der Künstler hat keine Zeit zu ver¬schwen¬den. Diese Fotografien zeigen Aquarelle, die ihrerseits anonyme Flug¬pas¬sa¬giere zeigen, die quasi en plein air in "airplane"-Kabinen dargestellt sind. Aus¬ser¬dem sieht man den Klapptisch am Sitz des Künstlers (und damit in diesem Fall: die Staffelei), den Farbkasten, die Pinsel, und andere nebensächliche Ge¬gen¬¬stände auf dem Tisch. Die dem Aquarell inhärente Unmittelbarkeit wird durch die Fotografie des Entstehungskontextes und – in einigen Fällen – gar von Kör¬perdetails des Künstlers selbst gebrochen. Zwischen den Betrachter und das Aquarell schiebt sich die sterile Oberfläche der Fotografie. 
Für weitere Informationen oder Abbildungen wenden Sie sich bitte an die Galerie.

 

2:47 p.m.2015Pigment print35.3 x 53.4 cm
Elan Greenwald
2:47 p.m.
2015
Pigment print
35,3 x 53,4 cm
Copyright Elan Greenwald
11:39 a.m.2014Pigment print35.3 x 53.4 cm
Elan Greenwald
11:39 a.m.
2014
Pigment print
35,3 x 53,4 cm
Copyright Elan Greenwald
7:27 p.m.2014Pigment print35.3 x 53.4 cm
Elan Greenwald
7:27 p.m.
2014
Pigment print
35,3 x 53,4 cm
Copyright Elan Greenwald
ge_2014_a-matter-of-appearance_detail_4_72dpi_mit-rahmen
Elan Greenwald
A Matter of Appearance (Detail)
2014
Watercolor on paper, pigment print on paper, aluminum, single channel video (color, silent)
7 watercolors: 53,3 x 43,2 cm each; 7 photographs: 8,6 x 20,3 cm each; video: 12 min 14 sec
Installation shot at CAC Gallery, Irvine, California
Copyright Elan Greenwald
A Matter of Appearance (detail view), Elan Greenwald, 2014, CAC Gallery, Irvine, California, May 8-16, 2014
Elan Greenwald
A Matter of Appearance (Detail)
2014
Watercolor on paper, pigment print on paper, aluminum, single channel video (color, silent)
7 watercolors: 53,3 x 43,2 cm each; 7 photographs: 8,6 x 20,3 cm each; video: 12 min 14 sec
Copyright Elan Greenwald
A Matter of Appearance (detail view), Elan Greenwald, 2014, CAC Gallery, Irvine, California, May 8-16, 2014
Elan Greenwald
A Matter of Appearance (Detail)
2014
Watercolor on paper, pigment print on paper, aluminum, single channel video (color, silent)
7 watercolors: 53,3 x 43,2 cm each; 7 photographs: 8,6 x 20,3 cm each; video: 12 min 14 sec
Copyright Elan Greenwald
A Matter of Appearance (detail view), Elan Greenwald, 2014, CAC Gallery, Irvine, California, May 8-16, 2014
Elan Greenwald
A Matter of Appearance (Detail)
2014
Watercolor on paper, pigment print on paper, aluminum, single channel video (color, silent)
7 watercolors: 53,3 x 43,2 cm each; 7 photographs: 8,6 x 20,3 cm each; video: 12 min 14 sec
Copyright Elan Greenwald
ge_2014_a-matter-of-appearance_detail_3_72dpi_mit-rahmen
Elan Greenwald
A Matter of Appearance (Detail)
2014
Watercolor on paper, pigment print on paper, aluminum, single channel video (color, silent)
7 watercolors: 53,3 x 43,2 cm each; 7 photographs: 8,6 x 20,3 cm each; video: 12 min 14 sec
Installation shot at CAC Gallery, Irvine, California
Copyright Elan Greenwald